Developed in conjunction with Ext-Joom.com

Tribal Members Login

Tribal Leaders

According to informant Jason Betzinez, Mahko was the last known chief of the Bedonkohe Apache Tribe.  He was born in the 1760’s or 70’s and died c. 1830’s.  His homeland, and that of his tribe, was in the area around the present Clifton, Arizona.  He had 2 wives, 6 children who grew to adulthood, 3 boys and 3 girls.  His 3 sons and 2 of his daughters were by his 1st wife.  One son was Taklishim, “The Gray One,” father of Geronimo and of Nah-dos-te, who married Nana of the Warm Springs Apaches.  Another son was the grandfather of E-clah-heh, who married Chief Naiche of the Chiricahuas and was the mother of Dorothy Naiche.  The 3rd son was the father of Goonah-hleenah, who married a daughter of Chief Mangus Coloradas and was the father of Sam Haozous.  One daughter of Mahko’s was the mother of Et-tso-hnn (Bonita) and grandmother of Fun, Tsisnah, Jozhe, and Black Girl.  Fun, Tsisnah and their half-brother Perico were regarded as 3 of Geronimo’s best warriors.  The other daughter of Mahko by his 1st wife was Nah-kede-tis, who was mother of Nah-thle-tla and grandmother of Jason Betzinez, Ellen Chachu, Ahnandia, and Nah-kay-godekonne.  Ahnandia was a warrior with Geronimo.  The 3rd daughter was by Mahko’s 2nd wife, and was the mother of Ish-keh, who became wife of Chief Juh of the Nednai Apaches and mother of Daklugie.  Mahko’s grandchildren Geronimo, Nah-thle-tla. and Nah-dos-te all lived to great ages.  Geronimo lived to 80 and Nah-dos-te to 88.  Nah-thle-tla died at age 110 and her son Jason died in a car accident at age 100.  According to Jason, Chief Mahko died of natural causes before the white people came to his area.  Geronimo’s father, who might have succeeded him was ill for some time and died while still young, after which Geronimo and his mother left the Bedonkohes and joined the Nednais.  Lacking a strong successor to Mahko, the tribe fragmented into lesser groups, coming under the dominance of the great Mimbreno chief Mangus Coloradas, particularly on war forays into Mexico, and later accepting the leadership of Cochise of the Chiricahuas.  In the 1860’s after several disasters which greatly reduced their numbers, the majority of the Bedonkohes merged with the Chiricahuas.  Some joined with the Warm Springs and others the Nednais, but the bulk of the tribe joined Cochise’s people and furnished much of the fighting blood that distinguished the Chiricahuas in the 1870’s and 1880’s.  By then, with the admixture of the Nednai remnants to the same tribe, the identities of the Bedonkohes were submerged in the general classification of all as Chiricahuas.

c.1790s-1863

Roan Shirt; Red Sleeves.  Last chief of the Mimbreno Apaches, who ranged in the Silver City-Santa Rita country of New Mexico and who subsequently merged with the more numerous Warm Springs when he became principal chief of all bands of the Warm Springs Tribe (1850’s).  Pledged friendship to the Americans (1846) but subsequently fought occupation of New Mexico by troops.  After he was killed (1863) he was succeeded as tribal leader by the dual Chiefs Apache Loco and Victorio who had previously shared the leadership of the Chihenne band.  Victorio was the more warlike of the two and rose to prominence with Nanay as leader of the hostile faction when the tribe was forced to remove from the Warm Springs reservation to San Carlos.  Sons of Mangus Coloradas were Sethmooda, who was killed by Mexicans in the Pinos Altos Mountains, and Mangus (Carl Mangus), who died as a scout at Fort Sill in 1901.  They were full brothers.  Seth-mooda married Bey-it-tsun, only daughter of Chief Loco and his 1st wife Chiz-pah-odlee.  Talbot Gooday was their only child.  Seth-mooda’s other son was Gail Marko, by a different wife, name not recalled.   Mangus married Dilth-cley-ih, a daughter of Chief Victorio, and their children were Frank, Cora, Faith, Flora, and Lilian Mangus.  Daughters of Chief Mangus Coloradas, all by the same mother as Mangus and Sethmooda, were Dos-teh-seh, who married Chief Cochise of the Chiricahua Tribe, Nah-ke-de-sah, who married a Bedonkohe Apache named Goonah-hleenah; and Ilth-tooda, who married a Chiricahua Apache, Astoyey.  No other sons or daughters of Mangus Coloradas are remembered, though there undoubtedly were others who died too far back to be recalled or who married into other tribes.  Likewise the only remembered wife of Mangus Coloradas is the mother of the sons and daughters named.  Their daughter Dos-teh-seh had sons Taza and Naiche by Cochise, each of whom in turn became chief of the Chiricahua Tribe; their daughter Nah-ke-de-sah had son Sam Haozous by Goonah-hleenah; and their daughter Ilth-tooda had son Ben and daughter Lena by Astoyey, both of whom died at Fort Sill.  Buried at Fort Sill are 1 son of Chief Mangus Coloradas (Mangus, in Post Cemetery); 2 daughters (Nah-ke-de-sah and Ilth-tooda) ; 5 grandchildren (Frank, Cora, and Faith Mangus, Talbot Gooday, and Gail Marko); and 14 great grandchildren (Paul, Lena, May, Granville, Jacob, Bah-nas-kli, Peter, and Roscoe Naiche; Frank and Maurine Gooday; Allyn and Margaret Haozous; and Ben and Lena Astoyey).  Numerous descendants of Mangus Coloradas survive today through his grandsons Naiche, Gooday, and Haozous, and his granddaughters Lilian Mangus who married George Martine, and Cora Mangus who married Kinzhuna.  It will be noted that through the marriage of Mangus Coloradas’ daughter Dos-teh-seh to Cochise, their son Naiche and his children descend from both these Chiefs; the marriage of Mangus Coloradas’ son Mangus to Victorio’s daughter Dilth-cley-ih, their children descend from these two chiefs, and through the marriage of Mangus Coloradas’ son Seth-mooda to Chief Loco’s daughter Bey-it-tsun, their son Talbot Gooday and children descend from both these chiefs.

c.1800-1874

Chief of the Chiricahua Apache Tribe.  Hostilities with U. S. troops began with the “Cut-through-the-tent” affair (1860).  When the Chiricahua Reservation was established (1872) he came in to stay.  Died there June 1874.  Cochise’s principal wife was Dos-teh-seh, a Mimbreno Apache, daughter of Mangus Coloradas.  By her he had sons Taza and Naiche (Natchez).  By another wife, of Chiricahua blood, name not recalled, he had daughters Dash-den-zhoos and Naithlotonz (Naiche-dos).  On his death Cochise was succeeded as chief of the Chiricahuas by his older son Taza, and on the latter’s death in Washington in 1876 the younger son Naiche succeeded.  Naiche, his mother Dos-teh-seh, and his two half-sisters lived through 27 years as prisoners-of-war and ended their days at Mescalero.  Dash-den-zhoos became the wife of Kay-dah-zinne and mother of Lena Morgan.  Naithlotonz was wife of Fred Gokliz and after his death married Chiricahua Tom.  Buried at Fort Sill are two daughters-in-law of Cochise (wives of Naiche), 6 grandsons (sons of Naiche), 2 granddaughters (daughters of Naiche), a grandnephew and a grandniece (children of Hugh Chee), and other more distant relatives.  Numerous descendants of Cochise survive today through the children of his son Naiche and his daughter Dash-den-zhoos.

c.1820-1880

Victorio

Victoria.  Born in what is now New Mexico.  He was a member of the Chihennes band.  After their chief, Tudeevia (Dudeevia; Delgadito) was killed by Mexicans (c.1855). Victorio and Apache Loco became dual chiefs of the Chihennes or Warm Springs proper.  Mangus Coloradas of the Mimbrenos band was overall chief of the Warm Springs Apache Tribe.  After he was killed by white men (1863) Victorio and Loco became the principal chiefs.  In October 1880 Victorio and his band were trapped and surrounded by the Carrizal Mexicans and Mexican troops at Twin Buttes (Tres Castillos) and died almost to the last man.  Victorio had 4 sons, and 3 of them were killed in the Victorio war.  Only the youngest, Istee (Charles Istee), survived.  He was then about 10 years old, and was not with Victorio’s band during the outbreak, but was with Loco and the other Warm Springs at San Carlos.  Istee was sent east with the other prisoners-of-war, attended Carlisle, then came on to Fort Sill and married Dora Chaendee, widow of Doaskada.  She was his only wife.  They had 1 daughter at Fort Sill, Jamia, who died here, and a son, Evan, born 1913 after they went to Mescalero.  Istee died there about 1946.  One of the other 3 sons of Victorio was the 1st husband of Zah-nah and father by her of Vincent Nahtalish, who was a small boy when his grandfather and father were killed.  Zah-nah then became the wife of Spitty and they had several children, including Lucy who married Aht-sitsinny (David Chinney).  All their children died at Fort Sill.  Zah-nah then married Skuyyuggi and they had 1 son, Sylvester.  Zah-nah died at Fort Sill 1904 and Sylvester died a year later.  Her son Vincent Nahtalish, grandson of Victorio, went to Carlisle.  Afterward he visited his people at Fort Sill several times but he never lived here.  He went to New York City to live and married a white woman there.  They had a son, Vincent V. Nahtalish Jr., born 1903.  Both Nahtalish and his son were registered at Fort Sill and they both received allotments in Oklahoma. Vincent Nahtalish Sr. died in New York.  His son was still living there as of 1960.  Chief Victorio also had a daughter, Dilth-cley-ih, who, by an early husband, name not recalled, had a daughter, Elsie Vance Chestuen.  Elsie attended Carlisle and died at Fort Sill 1898, no children.  Dilth-cley-ih’s 2nd and last husband was Mangus (Carl Mangus), who was a son of Chief Mangus Coloradas and brother of Seth mooda (Talbot Gooday’s and Gail Marko’s father), Dos-teh-seh (wife of Chief Cochise of the Chiricahuas and mother of Taza and Naiche), Nah-ke-de-sah (mother of Sam Haozous), and Ilth-tooda (wife of Astoyey). Dilth-cley-ih and Mangus had the following children:  Cora Mangus, who became wife of Kinzhuna; Frank Mangus, who died at Fort Sill 1903; Lilian Mangus, who became wife of George Martine; and Faith and Flora Mangus who died at Fort Sill.  Mangus and son Frank both enlisted in Troop “L” 7th Cavalry at Fort Sill, and Mangus was serving as a scout here when he died 1901.  Dilth-cley-ih went to Mescalero in 1913 as a widow.  Victorio also had a sister, Lozen.  She may never have married and is believed to have died in Alabama.  In summary, the following direct descendants of Victorio are buried at Fort Sill: 1 grandson (Frank Mangus), and 4 granddaughters (Faith and Flora Mangus; Jamia Istee; and Elsie Vance Chestuen).  Also 1 son-in-law (Mangus) and 1 daughter-in-law (Zah-nah).  Surviving descendants of Victorio at Mescalero consist of the children and children’s children of Arnold Kinzhuna and wife Cora Mangus, of George Martine and wife Lilian Mangus, and of Charles Istee if any still live.  A great grandson of Chief Victorio, Vincent V. Nahtalish Jr. (Half-Fort Sill Apache), resides in New York City.

1823-1905

Loco

Apache Loco.  He and Victorio were dual chiefs of the Warm Springs from the 1850’s to the 1880’s, but Loco was senior.  After Victorio’s death (1880) Loco was the only chief.  When Geronimo, Naiche, Chihuahua, and Nana broke out for the last time (1885), Chief Loco and most of the Warm Springs refused to take part in the outbreak.  Many of the Warm Springs enlisted as scouts with the Army, in the Geronimo campaign.  When Geronimo and Naiche had surrendered, Chief Loco was sent with Chatto and others to Washington to talk with the Government.  On the way back they were held at Fort Levenworth and then sent as prisoners-of-war to Florida, where they were joined as prisoners by the other Warm Springs and Chiricahuas.  From Florida they were sent to Alabama, and from Alabama to Fort Sill.  Here Loco was made head of Loco’s Village and his son John was enlisted as a scout, and they raised crops near Four-Mile Crossing.  Loco was the last living chief of the Warm Springs Apaches.  After his death in 1905 his son John became head of Loco’s Village.  Loco’s 1st and oldest wife was Chiz-pah-odlee, “Burning Wood”, died 1895.  She was a full sister of his 2nd wife Chish-odl-netln.  Chiz-pah-odlee and Chief Loco had only 1 child, a daughter, Bey-ih-tsun, born 1864, died in Oklahoma after allotment.  Bey-ih-tsun, by a 1st husband, name not recalled, had a daughter, Ken-i-ee-nidlth, who married Sundayman (Tsedekizen) and was mother of Grace Rose Sunday.  By a 2nd husband, Seth-mooda, who was a son of Mangus Coloradas, Bey-ih-tsun had a son Talbot Gooday.  And by a 3rd husband, Tahyan (Ruby) she had 2 daughters, Pinkie Tahyan, who died 1904, and Mabel Nahdoyah, who married Benedict Jozhe.  Chief Loco’s 2nd wife was Chish-odl-netln, “Wood Carrier”, died 1909.  She was mother of Dexter Loco, born 1864, who went to Mescalero.  Chief Loco’s 3rd and youngest wife was Clee-hn, died 1909, mother of Fritz Loco, died 1908, and John Loco.  By an earlier husband Clee-hn had a daughter Sy-e-konne, who married Toclanny.  Chief Loco died on 2 February 1905 at the age of 82, and is buried in the main Apache cemetery by Beef Creek on the military reservation.  Buried near him are his 3 wives, his son Fritz, and his granddaughter Ruth.

Baishan (Cuchillo Negro; Knife) chief of the Chihennes or Warm Springs Apaches.  Died in the revenge raid on Ramos (1850).

1843 – 26 Sep 1876

Tazi; Tazhe; Tah-ze; Tahzi; Tahzay; Tazhay.  Son of Chief Cochise of the Chiricahua Apaches and of his principal wife, Dos-teh-seh, “Something-at-the-campfire-already-cooked.”  She was a daughter of Chief Mangus Coloradas, last chief of the Mimbrenos and principal chief of the Warm Springs Apache Tribe.  Taza was older full brother of Naiche (Natchez).  Taza succeeded his father Cochise as chief of the Chiricahuas when the latter died in 1874, two years after the Chiricahua Reservation was established by General Howard.  In 1876 the tribe was removed from the Chiricahua reservation to San Carlos, and in September of the same year Taza was one of a delegation of Apaches taken to Washington D.C. for a visit.  He fell ill in Washington and died there of pneumonia on 26 September 1876, and was buried in the Congressional Cemetery.  Taza was succeeded as principal chief of the Chiricahuas by his younger brother Naiche.  Naiche was the last chief of the tribe.  Taza was about age 33 when he died.  He had no children.  Naiche was age 20 when he succeeded.  They had 2 half-sisters, daughters of Cochise by another wife, of Chiricahua blood, name not recalled.  The half-sisters were Dash-den-zhoos, who married Kay-dah-zinne and was mother of Lena Morgan and others; and Naithlotonz (Naiche-dos), who married Fred Gokliz and after his death married Chiricahua Tom.  Naiche had numerous children by 3 wives.  Taza’s uncles and aunts on his mother’s side (her full brothers and sisters) were Seth-mooda, who married Bey-it-tsun, only daughter of Chief Loco of the Warm Springs and his 1st wife Chiz-pah-odlee,  was father of Talbot Gooday and Gail Marko, and was killed by Mexicans in the Pinos Altos Mountains; Mangus, who married Dilth-cley-ih, a daughter of Chief Victorio of the Warm Springs, and had daughters Lilian and Cora Mangus and others; Nah-ke-de-sah, who married Goonah-hleenah, a Bedonkohe Apache, and was mother by him of Sam Haozous; and Ilth-toodah, who married Astoyey, a Chiricahua Apache, and was mother by him of 2 children who died at Fort Sill.  Mangus, Nah-ke-de-sah, and Ilth-toodah died at Fort Sill, as well as Seth-mooda’s son Gail Marko.  Taza’s mother Dos-teh-seh, his brother Naiche, and his half-sisters Dash-den-zhoos and Naithlotonz lived through the prisoner-of-war period and went to Mescalero.

1822 - Jul 1901

Chihuahua

Subchief of the Chiricahuas and "the first to quit fighting and go to Florida."  Surrendered his band to General Crook March 1886, along with Nana and Jolsanny, refusing to follow Geronimo and Naiche in their defection after the conference.  Chihuahua's band was the first to be sent to Florida for imprisonment, arriving at Fort Marion on 13 April 1886 and totaling 73 persons.  At Fort Sill Chihuahua was put in charge of a village, and despite his advanced years, being then in his 70's, was enlisted as a scout by General Scott in 1897, along with Geronimo, Chatto, and Mangus.  Died at Fort Sill 25 July 1901, during registration of homesteaders at the post for opening of the territory surrounding the military reservation to settlement.  Chihuahua had 3 wives.  Two of them, names not recalled, and two infant daughters died in Alabama.  His 3rd wife, Ilth-goz-ey, was mother of Eugene, Ramona, Emily, Osceola, and Tom, and probably of Mable.  After Chihuahua's death she married Victor Biete who died in 1911, and she went to Mescalero as a widow.  Chief Chihuahua was a full brother of Jolsanny (Olsanny, Josanie, Ulzanna).  He was also closely related to Kanesewah, Tissnolthtos, and Kaydahzinne, and likewise, probably through marriage, to Kaahteney, all of whom were regarded as "uncles" by his children.  Of Chihuahua's large family only his wife Ilth-goz-ey, his son Eugene, and three grandchildren survived to go to Mescalero.  Buried with him in a separate plot ¼th mile north of the main Apache cemetery by Beef Creek on the East Range of the Fort Sill Military Reservation are 2 sons, 2 daughters, 3 grandsons, 3 granddaughters, a son-in-law, his brother Jolsanny with 2 wives and 4 sons, 3 of the Kanesewah family, and Chino and wife Nah-go-tsi-eh.

1822-1896

Gil-Lee

Zele; Zeele; Zeelay; Zil-lee; Zee-lee.  Prominent Chiricahua leader and warrior along with Chatto and Benito during the Arizona wars.  Refused to take part in the final outbreak in 1885.  Father of Clay Domeah, husband of Clay’s mother Juana.

1856 - 16 Mar 1919

Naiche

Natchez; Nachez; Nachee; Nachite; Nahche; Nahchi.  Last chief of the Chiricahua Apache Tribe.  Hereditary chief.  Was the youngest son of Chief Cochise of the Chiricahuas and of his principal wife, Dos-teh-seh, "Something-at-the-campfire-already-cooked," who was a daughter of Chief Mangus Coloradas, last chief of the Mimbrenos and chief of the Warm Springs Apache Tribe.  Her full brothers were Seth-mooda, who married Bey-it-tsun, only daughter of Chief Loco of the Warm Springs and his 1st wife Chiz-pah-odlee, was father of Talbot Gooday and Gail Marko, and was killed by Mexicans in the Pinos Altos Mountains; and Mangus, who married Dilth-cley-ih, a daughter of Chief Victorio of the Warm Springs, had daughters Lilian and Cora Mangus and others, and who died at Fort Sill as a scout in 1901.  Her full sisters were Nah-ke-de-sah, who married Goonah-hleenah, a Bedonkohe Apache, and had a son Sam Haozous; and Ilth-tooda, who married Astoyey, a Chiricahua Apache.  Both sisters died at Fort Sill.  Naiche's older full brother was Taza (Tazhay).  They had 2 half-sisters, daughters of Cochise by another wife of Chiricahua blood, name not recalled.  The half-sisters were Dash-den-zhoos, who married Kay-dah-zinne and was mother of Lena Morgan and others; and Naithlotonz (Naiche-dos), who married Fred Gokliz and after his death married Chiricahua Tom.  The sisters lived through captivity and went to Mescalero.  Chief Cochise died in Arizona territory in 1874, two years after the Chiricahua reservation was established by General Howard.  He was succeeded as chief by Naiche's older brother Taza.  The Chiricahua Apaches were removed from their reservation to the San Carlos Reservation in June 1876.  In September of the same year Taza died in Washington D.C. while there with a delegation of Apaches.  Naiche then succeeded as principal chief of the Chiricahuas, with Chihuahua, Gil-lee, Chatto and others as band- or sub-chiefs.  He took part in the final outbreak with Geronimo, Chihuahua, Perico, and others in May 1885.  After the conference with General Crook (March 1886) Naiche and Geronimo fled back to the Sierra Madres.  Naiche had his 3rd wife Ha-o-zinne with him.  Chihuahua, with most of the Apaches who had left Fort Apache including Naiche's mother Dos-teh-seh, his 2nd wife E-clah-heh and daughter Dorothy, were sent to Florida as prisoners-of war by General Crook.  Later that summer when the scouts Kayihtah and Martine guided Lieutenant Gatewood to Geronimo's and Naiche's camp, Lieutenant Gatewood told Naiche that his mother, wife E-clah-heh, and daughter had been shipped to Florida with Chihuahua.  Naiche determined to surrender.  So did Perico and others, and this decided Geronimo, because he could not continue to fight without them.  Naiche and Geronimo and their bunch surrendered to General Miles at Skeleton Canyon, Arizona Territory, September 3, 1886.  Naiche's 3rd wife, Ha-o-zinne, her father, Old Man Beshe and her mother U-go-hun surrendered with him.  At Mount Vernon Barracks, Alabama, Naiche enlisted in Company "I", 12th Infantry, then transferred to the 7th Cavalry at Fort Sill, was made head of Naiche's Village, and enlisted as a scout by General Scott in 1897 along with Geronimo, Chihuahua, Mangus, and others.  Naiche's 1st wife was Nah-de-yole, a Chiricahua, and their children were Paul, Lena, and Peter Naiche.  Paul was Naiche's oldest son and attended Hampton Institute while in Alabama.  All died at Fort Sill, Nah-de-yole in 1896, Paul and Peter 1898, and Lena 1899.  Naiche's 2nd wife was E-clah-heh, "Under-the-Century-Plant".  She was a great granddaughter of Chief Mahko of the Bedonkohes, and 2nd cousin of Geronimo and of Ish-keh who was wife of Chief Juh of the Nednais; and a 1st cousin of Fun, Tsisnah, Jozhe, Sam Haozous's father Goonah-hleenah, and Jason Betzinez.  Their children were Dorothy, May, Bah-nas-kli, and Jane Naiche.  E-clah-heh died 1909, May died 1902, and Bah-nas-kli 1910, all at Fort Sill.  Dorothy attended Carlisle, married James Kaywaykla, and they took allotments in Oklahoma.  Naiche’s 3rd wife was Ha-o-zinne, "Standing-up-straight-like-a-tree."  She was Chiricahua, the daughter of Beshe and U-go-hun, and full sister of Tah-diskess who married Tooisgah.  Also related to Bessie Hunlona (Mrs. Bessie Gooday).  She and Naiche had the following children:  Christian Jr., Jacob, Amelia, Hazel, Granville, Barnabas, and Roscoe Naiche.  Jacob died 1904, Granville 1905, and Roscoe 1910, all at Fort Sill.  Chief Naiche therefore had 14 children.  He was one of those who was strongest for going to Mescalero.  When he went in 1913 he was accompanied by his 3rd and last wife Ha-o-zinne, sons Christian Jr., and Barnabas (Roosevelt), daughters Jane, Amelia, and Hazel, his mother Dos-teh-seh, his half-sisters Dash-den-zhoos, wife of Kaydahzinne and Naithlotonz, wife of Chiricahua Tom, and his in-laws Beshe and wife U-go-hun.  Of his immediate family only his daughter Dorothy remained in Oklahoma.  Buried at Fort Sill, as listed previously, are 2 of Naiche's wives, 6 sons, and 2 daughters.  With them were buried others of his relatives, including nieces and nephews, aunts and in-laws, as follows:  Do-lan, mother of Bessie Hunlona (Gooday) and grandmother of Dan Nicholas; Tah-dis-kess, sister of his 3rd wife Ha-o-zinne and wife of Tooisgah; Sadie and Hanna Kaydahzinne, daughter of his half-sister Dash-den-zhoos; Frederick Gokliz, husband of his half-sister Naithlotonz; Marcellus Bezhahun, brother of Blind Tom; Ruby Nashdelten, daughter of Simeon Nashdelten and Bessie Hunlona; Elsie Nicholas, 1st wife of James Nicholas; their son Henry Nicholas; Sallie, Ernest, and Albert (Dan) Tooisgah, children of Naiche's sister-in-law Tahdiskess; Cyril Chatto, son of Old Chatto and Beygiscleyaihn; Esther Chatto, daughter of  Maurice Chatto and Lena Kaydahzinne; and Clement Nahgodleda.  Naiche was the youngest of the Apache chiefs and outlived them all.  His older brother Taza, who died in 1876, had no children, and no children of his half-sister Naithlotonz are known to have survived.  Consequently the descendants of Cochise are traced only through Naiche and his half-sister Dash-den-zhoos who married Kaydahzinne.  Those on Naiche's side are likewise descendants of Mangus Coloradas through Naiche's mother Dos-teh-seh.  Numerous descendants survive, both in Oklahoma (children and grandchildren of Dorothy Naiche and James Kaywaykla) and in New Mexico (children and grandchildren of Christian Naiche Jr. and his brother and sisters, and of Dash-den-zhoos and Tim Kaydahzinne).

- Abt. 1855

Dudeevia; Delgadito.  Father of Nonithian; paternal grandfather f Jason Betzinez.  According to Jason, Tudeevia succeeded Baishan (Cuchillo Negro; Knife) as chief of the Chihennes or Warm Springs Apaches after the latter’s death in the revenge raid on Ramos (1850).  Died circa 1855 and was succeeded by the dual chiefs Apache Loco and Victorio.

1846-1901

Mangus

Mangas.  Son of Chief Mangus Coloradas.  Seth-mooda was his full brother.  His full sisters were Dos-teh-seh, who was wife of Chief Cochise of the Chiricahuas, and mother of Chiefs Taza and Naiche; Nah-ke-de-sah, who married a Bedonkohe named Goonah-hleenah and was the mother of Sam Haozous and Ilth-tooda who married a Chiricahua, Astoyey, and had children Ben and Lena, both of whom died at Fort Sill.  Seth-mooda had a son, Gail Marko, who died at Fort Sill.  His other wife was Bey-it-tsun, daughter of Chief Loco of the Warm Springs by whom he had son Talbot Gooday.  Seth-mooda was killed by Mexicans in the Pinos Altos Mountains.  Mangus was young when his father died (1863) and Apache Loco and Victorio became chiefs of all the Warm Springs.  In the last years before surrender, Mangus was more with the Chiricahuas than the Warm Springs.  He was on his way back to Fort Apache (October 1886) to voluntarily surrender when he met some soldiers, who took them in.  He and 1 other were sent to Fort Pickens and the 3 women and 5 children with them were sent to Fort Marion.  Later, at Mount Vernon Barracks Alabama, he enlisted in Company “I”, 12th Infantry.  Mangus was married to Dilth-cley-ih, a daughter of Chief Victorio.  She had a daughter, Elsie Vance Chestuen, by a previous husband.  She and Mangus had the following children: Cora, who became wife of Kinzhuna; Frank, who died at Fort Sill 1903; Lilian, who became wife of George Martine, the son of the old scout Martine; and Faith and Flora who died at Fort Sill.  Mangus also raised Sam Kenoi, son of Old Fatty, as a child.  Bey-gin-zhoos, one of the oldest Apaches at Fort Sill, who died here 1906, was Mangus’ aunt on the female side of the family.  Both Mangus and his son Frank served in Troop “L” 7th Cavalry at Fort Sill, and Mangus was head of Mangus’s Village.  In 1897 General Scott enlisted Mangus as a scout, along with Geronimo, Chihuahua and others.  Mangus was a scout when he died, 9 February 1901, and was buried in the Post Cemetery.  His relatives buried in the main Apache cemetery at Fort Sill include his son Frank, his daughters Flora and Faith, his sisters Nah-ke-de-sah and Ilth-too-da, his step-daughter Elsie Chestuen, his nephews Gail Marko, Talbot Gooday, and Ben and Lena Astoyey, his aunt Bey-gin-shoos, his former sister-in-law Zah-nah, relatives on the Naiche side, and others.